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Archive for the ‘Personal Blog’ Category

Sometimes I think about a problem or situation that doesn’t have an obvious solution. I don’t always keep those ruminations myself, since I often have hope that someone else can come up with funding or a program to help. So, please bear with me.

The situation? Follow my thinking here.

My dad passed away 30 years ago, prior to the digital age, or at least before it developed into what it is now. I remember that he had artistic talent, but his color blindness made painting almost impossible, though I remember he did a watercolor mural of a winter scene that was remarkable (even with green-tinted snow). He started a sci-fi novel once. I’m not sure how far he got with it, but it was about a family on vacation when an atomic war began.

My mother-in-law kept a written journal. She started it in 1953 when she married my father-in-law and kept them up until she passed away in 2010. Along with those journals, we picked up about 20 boxes of photographs from family outings and other events over the decades.

Personally, as a photographer and author, I have created over 50,000 photos, 350 poems, 7 completed novels and 2 partial manuscripts, a movie script, almost 50 published and unpublished articles, a poet’s how-to and two published non-fiction books.

When my wife and I are gone, what will become of all of that data? I know next to nothing about any writing, diaries, art, painting or interests of my past relatives, mostly because computers didn’t exist for most of it. It would be great to be able to read my great-great-grandfather’s short stories or see my aunt’s black-and-white photos, all long gone.

So, my ruminations. There should be an organization that digitizes, for free, a person’s lifetime of work and creativity, for the ages. Yes, you can find birth and employment records on an online genealogy service, but good luck finding someone’s incomplete novel or their collection of pencil drawings. What I envision is a non-profit company, either funded by the government or branches of current technology companies (Facebook, FamilyTree and the like), with an easy to use uploading service. In my mind, the data collected wouldn’t be readily available to the general public until the owner passes away, and would be controlled by that person’s executor or administrator, neither of which would preclude someone uploading theoir own or family member’s content.

Now, remember — I said I hadn’t completely thought it through. Is there a negative of storing personal data? Of course. Maybe someone is found to have been a pedophile or murderer. Should those events be attached? Who gets to make that decision? Should an unpopular or infamous family member get the same consideration as others in the family, and, if so, who will make that happen? Do you really want Jeffery Dahmer’s childhood drawings or Charles Manson’s manifestos available? Perhaps.

I have other reservations as well, but, overall, the thought of all my content that has taken years to create is worth saving for future generations, just like the work of my dad or the daily memories of my mother-in-law.

Someone younger than myself should look into a grant or other funding to start up a digital family legacy program and let us start uploading to it. With drive space so cheap and bandwidth so available, it’s not going to take a billion dollars to set up. I could be wrong about that, I suppose.

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This posting has been removed as the article has been purchased by an outstanding RV’er periodical. More info to come!

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Bird's Shadow and Metropolitan
Bird’s Shadow and Metropolitan

“Bird’s Shadow and Metropolitan”
Photo of the Week #13, selected in August, 2019

The decrepit building in the nearly-abandoned town of Miami, Arizona, caught my attention when I saw the trailered Metro parked in front. My dad used to drive a baby-blue-and-white Nash Metropolitan when I was growing up, so there’s some nostalgia there, at least for me.

I love coming across interesting old relics or structures and imagining what they were like when they were first built and actively inhabited. This particular edifice looked like it once possessed real personality. I was pleased to have successfully captured a bird’s shadow on the faded blue wall.

Miami is a classic Western copper boomtown, though the copper mines are largely dormant now. There is a renovation underway, slowly, and the town is beginning to attract new residents to its low-cost housing.

As always, please click on the link to view the clear, full-color image:

https://www.imagekind.com/-birds-shadow-and-metropolitandsc_art?IMID=89cbdbbb-163b-462a-8606-07f6a34fffbe


View all of my Photos of the Week here on Imagekind:

http://huberjack.imagekind.com/store/Images.aspx/385a532b-9a90-4b4f-8c67-b25c1afa1c07/PhotosoftheWeek

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Pacific Coast Garden
Pacific Coast Garden

“Pacific Coast Garden”
Photo of the Week #10, selected in July, 2019

We had the good fortune to drive up the Pacific Coast and explore its fabulous scenery that extends over a thousand miles. In the Monterrey coastal area of California, many of the cliffs that overlook the ocean are covered with flowers and succulents. This is one of my favorite photos from one beautiful day of shooting.

Unfortunately, this widespread Northern California groundcover, called highway ice plant (also pigface, sour fig and clawberry), is an invasive species from South Africa. Any part or shoot of the species can grow into a full new plant, so you should take great pains not to transport them, and, like any invasive species, it should never be planted in a garden.

As always, please click on the link to view the clear, full-color image:

https://www.imagekind.com/-pacific-coast-gardendsc_art?IMID=02dcebf0-f5b2-46bc-953f-19526e322833


View all of my Photos of the Week here on Imagekind:

http://huberjack.imagekind.com/store/Images.aspx/385a532b-9a90-4b4f-8c67-b25c1afa1c07/PhotosoftheWeek

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I was discussing the three-day drive across Texas we’ve taken in the past and wondered how that stretch compares to other states.  I decided to let Google Maps be my guide as I looked throughout the country for similar treks for the nine longest in-state drives.

I created a few ground rules, such as any route candidate for my list being calculated as the shortest drive between two cities or towns. This means that there may be longer routes to or from unincorporated towns not showing on Google Maps.  I can’t do much about that.  I only utilized routes that stayed within the state being researched.  A few shorter routes may have existed through neighboring states.  Also, traffic, season and weather don’t affect distance, so I kept to miles instead of hours.

One last point – I didn’t research all 50 states.  Obviously, states like Hawaii, Rhode Island and Delaware won’t be on any longest drive list.  But as I calculated the most extensive drives in states like Pennsylvania, Maine, Virginia and North Carolina, it became clear that most candidates were less than 400 miles.  With the 9th largest stretching 629 miles, I could visually rule out dozens of states.

Here’s the list, ranked shortest to longest:

9.  Oklahoma-  Kenton to Tom- 629 miles

Many of the states on this list are of medium size compared to the rest of the country but have irregular shapes that provide longer routes.  This is true of Oklahoma, where we start at the edge of the panhandle and drive cattycorner to the bottom of the pan, covering over 600 miles.  The route only utilizes a few dozen miles on an interstate (I-40) and flows through Oklahoma City smack dab in the middle of the Sooner State.

8.  Michigan-  Copper Harbor to Erie Township- 631 miles

Situated at the northern tip of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, or U.P., is Copper Harbor on Lake Superior, and it’s now on my bucket list to visit.  On the other end of the drive is a small town near Ohio on Lake Erie.  In between, the Mitten State will provide a variety of sights and views of three of the Great Lakes.

7.  Nevada-  Laughlin to Denio- 698 miles

It was surprising to see Nevada on this list.  Laughlin is found near the state junction points of Nevada, California and Arizona in the far south of the Silver State. Almost 700 miles north is Denio, a small town at the Oregon border.  Along the way, you’ll see some of the state’s desert and scablands, Las Vegas and other gambling meccas, and many miles of secluded highway. 

6.  Montana-  Troy to Ridge- 721 miles

I did expect to see the Big Sky Country in the Top 9, but the surprise was that it wasn’t longer than a few others on the list.  Troy is in the northeast corner near the Idaho border, sitting in the middle of the Kootenai National Forest.  Over 700 miles southeast is Ridge in the opposite corner.  The two towns show a stark contrast in environments, with Troy in the midst of fabulous forested mountains and Ridge reminding more of the barren hills of the Dakotas. 

5.  Idaho-  Good Grief to Fish Haven- 827 miles

Another panhandle, another long drive.  At the far northern edge of the Gem State is the best city name on this list, Good Grief.  Because the most direct route takes you through Montana, we had to calculate traveling through Boise to stay in Idaho to reach the southeast corner of the state at Fish Haven.  This takes you along several mountain ranges and forests until you reach the capital city, then the scenery becomes more scrub-like. 

4.  Florida-  Muscogee to Key West- 840 miles

Let’s face it, panhandles give states an edge to get on this list, and the Sunshine State is no exception.  Like Oklahoma, we begin on the far eastern edge of the panhandle in the town of Muscogee, then head west to the body of Florida before driving south, all the way to the Keys.  The distance between the two is so far that Google shows the direct flying time to be almost four hours.  The inland drive will repeat the same scenery for much of the trip, except for the time you are near the ocean.  On this jaunt, south is best, as it includes West Palm Beach, Fort Lauderdale, Miami, the Everglades and Key West, many of which are on most people’s bucket lists.

3.  Texas-  El Paso to Orange- 858 miles

Now we see the state that started it all, Texas, and its 3-day straight shot east from El Paso, all on I-10.  The Lone Star State is vast and mostly barren, though green by comparison to much of the southwest.  Hundreds of miles after leaving El Paso, you’ll finally reach San Antonio, the 7th largest city in the country, and about 3 hours later, Houston, the 4th largest.  Orange is just across the state line from Lake Charles, LA, and is hurricane susceptible.

2.  California.- Smith River to Winterhaven- 1008 miles

Not far from the Oregon coast is Smith River, California, a continuation of the fabulous northwest coastline.  This path takes you south along the coast until you reach San Francisco, then it heads inland through wine country and the Big Valley, before hitting the Los Angeles metropolitan area.  From there you travel east, then south towards Mexico, ending up in Winterhaven, next to Yuma, AZ.  You’ll see a wide range of panoramic views of ocean, coastline, vineyards, agriculture, historic cities, theme parks, and southwestern deserts.  It’s never a bad time to take in a thousand miles of the Golden State.

1.  Alaska-  Homer to Prudhoe Bay- 1074 miles

As we all expected, the Last Frontier takes the top spot for providing the longest in-state drive.  Interestingly, the longest route I could locate included just the main body of the state, since so much of Alaska is inaccessible by car, even in the summer.  Speaking of summer, that’s the only season most of this route is safe.  But, the views!  Prudhoe Bay is on the Arctic Ocean and was built atop the tundra.  This route is almost 1,100 miles in length and just about every mile has dramatic views.  Like many awe-inspiring landscapes, photographs along this byway simply can’t do them justice. 

Honorable Mention-  Missouri- Watson to Cottonwood Point- 560 miles

At nearly 600 miles long, the Show-Me State was just out of the Top 9, but the odd-shaped state still deserves a mention.   In the far northwest corner, Watson is more like Nebraska than Missouri.  The lack of a direct route to the southeastern notch forces the route to take a bit of a zig zag, traveling south along the Nebraska and Kansas state lines, hanging a left in Kansas City and a right at St. Louis, then south along the Illinois line and the mighty Mississippi River.  This would definitely be an interesting drive.

Now, then, these are the longest drives in the country that don’t cross state lines.  Many of these are now on my future to-do list, if not my bucket list.  I trust you have the same interest.

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“An Emerald Delight”
Photo of the Week #9, selected in July, 2019

A few miles north of Crested Butte, Colorado, nestled in the Elk Mountains between Mount Baldy and Mount Bellview, is a lake with a beautiful hue. Crested Butte has some of the most beautiful sights to explore and Emerald Lake is certainly no exception. The alpine lake sits above 11,000 feet and is one of two so-named lakes in Colorado, the other being in the greater Rocky Mountain National Park.

Shortly after taking this photo, we had it printed to canvas and framed for our (then) living room wall — the centerpiece of the room’s decor! The sun, clouds, shadows and pines made the canvas print appear as a painting, especially when the sun shone on it from the nearby living room window. The color print is now one of four prominent photos in our fifth wheel’s living room.

As always, please click on the link to view the clear, full-color image:

https://www.imagekind.com/-an-emerald-delightdsc_art?IMID=2abf7900-4060-47a0-a672-c4d9225afedd


View this photo as artwork:

http://huberjack.imagekind.com/store/imagedetail.aspx/1c45a6a3-6ce9-481b-91ab-324c815e08a8/Col_Pencil_An_Emerald_Delight_DSC00243


View all of my Photos of the Week here on Imagekind:

http://huberjack.imagekind.com/store/Images.aspx/385a532b-9a90-4b4f-8c67-b25c1afa1c07/PhotosoftheWeek

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For the past several years, I’ve been watching my calorie intake and managed, at least until my retirement, to lose several dozen pounds. One problem when dieting, even when it’s a permanent lifestyle change, is what to do when you are hungry but limited in food intake.

A decade ago, as I closed in on my target weight and the one year mark since I began limiting calories, I thought about my go-to snacks, such as frozen lemonade, low-cal pumpkin bread, slow-churned vanilla ice cream and trail mix. Trail mix, in particular, seems to be nature’s perfect concoction. Peanuts and mixed nuts, raisins and M&M’s give both the salt and sweet I crave, seemingly without adding a single pound to my weight. At least, that’s the way it feels.

When I searched the Internet for trail mix articles, I found that some strongly railed against both M&M’s and craisins in trail mixes as unreasonable sources of sugar. My own results seem to contradict these reports. Sometimes a little sugar keeps me from eating a lot of sugar. Finding go-to, low-calorie snacks is vital to a successful weight-loss program. As a thoroughly non-professional in nutrition and dietary matters, I highly recommend this perfect food.

So, I began using Mountain Trail Mix as my go-to munchie and found that my weight changed very little due to this incredible snack mix. One day I thought that the mix could use more cashews and started adding them to the pre-packaged mix, then some craisins, and finally decided I might as well make my own trail mix from scratch. I don’t think it’s any cheaper this way, but I get exactly what I want in the mix. I’ll include costs so you can judge for yourself.

Here’s what to purchase (2020 costs):

Mixed NutsGreat Value- 26 oz container $8.98
Cashews- Halves and PiecesGreat Value- 24 oz container$10.25
Craisins​Ocean Spray- 24 oz bag $5.88
RaisinsGreat Value- 20 oz container $2.94
Chocolate CandyM&M®/Mars​- 24 oz bag $4.86

These represent the brands and sizes I normally purchase for one batch of Huberville Trail Mix, and there will be leftovers from the craisins, raisins and M&M’s to use in future batches. I find that store brands work fine for the nuts and raisins but the name brands are worth springing for on the other ingredients. Feel free to use whichever brands you like.

I start by gathering my largest mixing bowl, a 2-cup measuring cup and a 1-gallon re-closable plastic storage container. I have found that the mix will last longer in a hard plastic container than in a zip-lock bag. Here is the process:

Wash your hands

Place the full contents of the mixed nuts (26 oz equals approximately 6 cups) into the mixing bowl.

Add the full contents of the cashew halves and pieces (24 oz equals approximately 6 cups) into the mixing bowl.

Measure 3 cups of craisins and add into mixing bowl

Measure 1-3/4 cups of raisins and add into mixing bowl

Measure 1-3/4 cups of M&M’s and add into mixing bowl

With clean or gloved hands, mix the contents together, repeatedly bringing the ingredients on the bottom of the bowl to the top and turning the bowl several times

Using the measuring cup, pour your trail mix into one or more storage containers

I find that this recipe makes a little over 18 cups of Huberville Trail Mix, which fills a gallon container with almost three cups left over. Go ahead, fill and store the gallon container, then pour the remaining mix into a serving bowl and enjoy the snack!

My best guess on calories would be approximately 300 per 6 tablespoons, or about a third of a cup of trail mix. That’s about how much I eat in a single sitting. Because of the sweet, salty, chocolaty and fruity aspects of the mix, I find a small handful easily tides me over until my next regular meal. I even keep a small container in my headboard for a late night snack.

The total cost of this 18-cup mixture is around $28.00, or about $1.50 per cup (again, 2020 costs), a very affordable goodie, and one that just may save you from devouring many more calories between meals.

One last thought- I will sometimes add different ingredients to change things up, such as dried bananas or fruit, semi-sweet or dark chocolate chips, chocolate-powdered or flavored almonds, and so on. I only do that on occasion… and I always come back to this recipe, unmodified. Enjoy!

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While taking some incredible photos in the Grand Tetons a couple of years ago, it occurred to me just how many National Parks we’ve had the good fortune to visit. We don’t have a bucket list or a specific goal of seeing every National Park, but we have enjoyed more than a few.

The United States has set aside just under 65 protected areas of the country (plus one shared by Canada) known as National Parks. Since Nadyne and I have been together, we have visited 29 of them, with more on the horizon. It didn’t hurt that we lived in Colorado and in proximity to Utah, but we stopped in many of the parks after we hit the road in our 5th wheel.

Our favorite so far? That’s a difficult choice. I loved Zion and Bryce, and camping on the edge of the Badlands was memorable. Acadia was a bucket list item for me that didn’t disappoint, as was Campobello for Nadyne, along with Rainier and St. Helens. We were both in awe of the sheer size of the giant redwoods, the splendor of the Rockies and, of course, the sights and sounds of the mighty glaciers in Alaska. And I didn’t even mention the Grand Canyon. No, there’s just no way to choose.

Here is the current list (as of this post) of the National Parks we’ve toured, followed by a slideshow of a few of my pics of some of those remarkable places:

  • Acadia (ME)
  • Arches (UT)
  • Badlands (SD)
  • Black Canyon of the Gunnison (CO)
  • Bryce Canyon (UT)
  • Campobello Int’l (ME-NB)
  • Canyonlands (UT)
  • Death Valley (CA-NV)
  • Everglades (FL)
  • Glacier Bay (AK)
  • Grand Canyon (AZ)
  • Grand Teton (WY)
  • Great Sand Dunes (CO)
  • Great Smoky Mountains (TN)
  • Hot Springs (AR)
  • Joshua Tree (CA)
  • Lassen (CA)
  • Mammoth Cave (KY)
  • Mount Rainier (WA)
  • Mount St. Helens (WA)
  • New River Gorge (WV)
  • Petrified Forest (AZ)
  • Pinnacles (CA)
  • Redwood (CA)
  • Rocky Mountain (CO)
  • Saguaro (AZ)
  • Sand Dunes (CO)
  • Wind Cave (SD)
  • Zion (UT)
  • Acadia (ME)
  • Arches (UT)
  • Badlands (SD)
  • Black Canyon of the Gunnison (CO)
  • Bryce Canyon (UT)
  • Campobello International (ME-NB)
  • Canyonlands (UT)
  • Everglades (FL)
  • Glacier Bay (AK)
  • Grand Canyon (AZ)
  • Grand Teton (WY)
  • Great Sand Dunes (CO)
  • Hot Springs (AR)
  • Joshua Tree (CA)
  • Mount Rainier (WA)
  • Mount St. Helens (WA)
  • Pinnacles (CA)
  • Redwood (CA)
  • Rocky Mountain (CO)
  • Saguaro (AZ)
  • Sand Dunes (CO)
  • Wind Cave (SD)
  • Zion (UT)

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Over several years, with our long-term plans to travel full-time underway, my wife and I read blogs and watched YouTube videos, almost ad nauseum, regarding downsizing to an RV. Sell, store or give everything away, they said. It will be hard, they said. We believed them.

Then, excitingly, it was upon us. We sold our 1,700 sq. ft. house and started downsizing in earnest to move into 340 sq. ft. It WAS hard, and it didn’t happen overnight. We took the necessary and difficult steps — selling, storing and giving away stuff — over months, and we still had to store much more than we had hoped. By “D-Day,” as in “Departure Day,” we had to be out.

While they mention the emotional pain of minimizing your possessions, what the bloggers and YouTubers don’t really tell you is that some of the pain is about the pure loss of value. Thousands of dollars’ worth of things we bought because we needed them, or wanted them, was left behind. We obviously didn’t have room for everything, so, intellectually, it made sense. However, years later, we still feel the loss of monetary value from starting our day-to-day nomadic life, especially when most of the significant downsizing happened over a relatively short period of time. Even small, unsellable items can bear a cost. If we paid $30 each for a hundred of these, they would have cost us $3,000 accumulatively.

Let’s say I want to buy a new TV or notebook and give away my old one, even if it works fine, or a wine rack is in the way and we decide to sell it to free up space. Those individual decisions are easy to live with. But, in the span of a month, we dealt away or carted to storage our living room and bedroom furniture, our guest room furniture, the dining room set, two wine racks, two big-screen TV’s, most of the house’s décor, half of my tools, three-quarters of our wardrobes, and even a car. Everything we had stored for a rainy day was gone.

​Even a few of these items can be difficult to think about, but our belongings were literally $20,000 less valuable than they were a month before leaving for the road, money we spent right out of our checkbook (we paid off all our material debt long before, thank goodness). The cash we gained in selling furniture, etc., was a pittance compared to their original values.

And then there is the emotional pain that the bloggers and Youtubers do tell you about. You can prepare for it, but it was a far more difficult experience than we expected. It was your stuff, sometimes for decades, and soon it would be left behind, perhaps never to be seen again. For most people, emotional attachments don’t dissolve easily.

Just as with anything we have to deal with in life, we tried to focus on the positive and look forward to many years of long-awaited travel. We have been able to visit friends and family we haven’t seen in years, or ever, and we finally were able to experience different parts of the country for more than a long weekend at a time. For most people, emotional attachments don’t dissolve easily. Indeed, on our journey, I’ve taken tens of thousands of photographs, and we have experienced 32 National Parks and 40 states.

​It took over ten years for the choice of living on the road to come to fruition. I just wish we had known how divesting most of our possessions would make us feel. In the four years since we began our journey, we have continued to downsize, with experience providing the impetus to do so. When we started, we didn’t really know what we didn’t know. As time went on, it became obvious that, even with all the stuff we left behind, we were still overstocked. The first three years, we returned to Denver each summer to off-load more items and clothing to our storage unit, then moved the all that stuff to our permanent winter base in Texas. That has eased the conflict of what to take on our travels and what to leave behind, but, if we’re not careful, we will have to go through the process again. Our space is not unlimited.

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When we decided to move from Kansas, we had a tough time deciding where to live. I had had my fill of the flat, nondescript Midwest and Nadyne wanted nothing to do with living on the Pacific coast (they have earthquakes, mudslides, wildfires and volcanos there) or the extreme heat of Arizona. We had lived in Buffalo, NY, and I was over winter and arctic temperatures. We lived for a few years in Las Vegas and the temps there are brutal, too, besides the fact that it’s the ultimate tourist town, not so great for locals.

Somehow we pared our list of possible destinations from twenty to ten, then to five. After looking at employment stats, we ended up choosing Denver, and bought a manufactured home in a northern suburb. I knew about their winters, but Colorado’s natural beauty was an exciting aspect my photographer’s eye couldn’t pass up. Unfortunately, unbeknownst to me, all that beauty begot crowds.

Here’s an example of a surprising hiking experience. We decided to go hiking in the mountains one summer weekend on a fairly easy trail on Guanella Pass, about two hours from home. Having heard that it’s a popular trail, we got up at 3:30 am (still dark) and left by 4 (in the morning!). We got there at 6:05 am to find the trailhead parking lot and about a half-mile of roadside in both directions completely full of vehicles of all types and sizes. When I thought about it, that meant that most of these people had gotten up and left even before we did. There are almost 3 million residents in the Denver metropolitan area, and another million in Colorado Springs region, and a lot of those people are in Colorado for the same reason we moved here. Add to that the international draw of the Rocky Mountains, several national parks, Pikes Peak, the “Fourteeners” mountain peaks and the abundance of wildlife, to be “one” with nature is nearly impossible — there’s just not much solitude to experience.

One would think that a world-famous ski region would only be crowded in the winter. Au contraire. Colorado and its nearly six million residents, along with millions of visitors, can be as crowded as an elevator in Times Square year-round.

​So went the struggle during our six years living north of Denver. I’m definitely not sorry we moved there — my photographer’s itch was relieved many times over, we met some amazing friends there, and it was where we began our RV camping lifestyle. But, even after learning when the most and least popular visitor days and times were, there were numerous weekends that found us staying home when we really wanted to be in the mountains. Luckily I’m not into winter sports or I would have a whole separate diatribe to share.

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