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Posts Tagged ‘nature’

Winter Sunset with Stump
Winter Sunset with Stump

“Winter Sunset with Stump”
Photo of the Week #15, selected in August, 2019

Another one of my favorite photos from Kansas, this pic was taken in winter at Cheney Reservoir in the central part of the state, the lake frozen over and a tree stump making a shadow in the sunset. Well played, Kansas. Well played.

Kansas will eventually frustrate local photographers, since there are only so many scenes of waving wheat and grassy plains one can shoot. However, with patience, opportunities like this are often presented if one is open and ready for them. In the few years I lived there, I went on several photo outings with the hope of coming across something interesting, even in the middle of winter. One this day, my optimism was rewarded.

Here’s my photo on Imagekind:
https://www.imagekind.com/-winter-sunset-with-stumpp_art?IMID=28947ff9-778f-45c9-993a-3cfdf723adda


View all of my Photos of the Week here on Imagekind:
http://huberjack.imagekind.com/store/Images.aspx/385a532b-9a90-4b4f-8c67-b25c1afa1c07/PhotosoftheWeek

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Wildflowers Loving Life
Wildflowers Loving Life

“Wildflowers Loving Life”
Photo of the Week #14, selected in August, 2019

Those who know me can assure you that I love birds and wildflowers, so much so that I have taken thousands of photos of both all over the country. These lupine flowers just seemed to be overjoyed to be alive and thriving in the California desert, despite their hardship, and this shot is a favorite among my wildflower photos. Lupines are relatives of the famous Texas bluebonnets.

I took this shot while hiking near our boondocking spot just outside of Joshua Tree National Park. It was surprising to see such color in the hot desert, adding to the feeling of delight when I came across the seemingly elated blossoms.

As always, please click on the link to view the clear, full-color image:
https://www.imagekind.com/-wildflowers-loving-lifedsc_art?IMID=a96bc9b6-866c-4c29-ae5a-c6dda41440e3


View this photo as artwork:
http://huberjack.imagekind.com/store/imagedetail.aspx/faa4640a-97bc-4bb8-8a14-bc5407ab37d6/Oil_Wildflowers_Loving_Life_DSC03683


View all of my Photos of the Week here on Imagekind:
http://huberjack.imagekind.com/store/Images.aspx/385a532b-9a90-4b4f-8c67-b25c1afa1c07/PhotosoftheWeek

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Snack Time for a Chipmunk
Snack Time for a Chipmunk

“Snack Time for a Chipmunk”
Photo of the Week #12, selected in August, 2019

Not far from the popular Bear Lake in the Rocky Mountain National Park is another, smaller pool, the beautiful Sprague Lake, where I have taken many photos. One such pic was this chipmunk, seemingly impervious to my presence. Evidently nothing stands between a chipmunk and his snack…

As always, please click on the link to view the clear, full-color image:

https://www.imagekind.com/-snack-time-for-a-chipmunkdsc_art?IMID=9da5c243-4454-4d1a-9492-b9bb700e7eeb


View all of my Photos of the Week here on Imagekind:

http://huberjack.imagekind.com/store/Images.aspx/385a532b-9a90-4b4f-8c67-b25c1afa1c07/PhotosoftheWeek

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Alaskan Eagle Taking Flight
Alaskan Eagle Taking Flight

“Alaskan Eagle Taking Flight”
Photo of the Week #11, selected in July, 2019

During our Alaska cruise a couple of years ago, it was difficult to get as many striking photos as I’d hoped, the region having been inundated with smoke from vast forest fires burning in Northern Canada. I was able to take a few excellent shots, however, and this bald eagle was the star of our glacier stop. This wondrous living symbol of America, which had been sitting on a chunk of ice floating in Glacier Bay, posed for several minutes as we approached, then took flight, fortunately while I was targeting it with my telephoto lens. The water in the bay was a dull blue due to the silt deposited by the glaciers.

Glacier Bay is the product of the Little Ice Age, a geologically recent glacial advance in northern regions. The Little Ice Age reached its maximum extent around 1750. Since then, the massive glacier that filled the bay has retreated 65 miles to the heads of its inlets. With global climate change, the retreat has accelerated and it is perhaps in the process of disappearing completely, at least until the next Ice Age.

As always, please click on the link to view the clear, full-color image:

https://www.imagekind.com/-alaskan-eagle-taking-flightdsca_art?IMID=276db322-45b5-4011-a2d5-982f4f4268fa


View this photo as artwork:

http://huberjack.imagekind.com/store/imagedetail.aspx/7f220dbd-65f9-4aca-811c-f463306b4f40/Oil_Alaskan_Eagle_Taking_Flight_DSC06444a


View all of my Photos of the Week here on Imagekind:

http://huberjack.imagekind.com/store/Images.aspx/385a532b-9a90-4b4f-8c67-b25c1afa1c07/PhotosoftheWeek

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While taking some incredible photos in the Grand Tetons a couple of years ago, it occurred to me just how many National Parks we’ve had the good fortune to visit. We don’t have a bucket list or a specific goal of seeing every National Park, but we have enjoyed more than a few.

The United States has set aside just under 65 protected areas of the country (plus one shared by Canada) known as National Parks. Since Nadyne and I have been together, we have visited 29 of them, with more on the horizon. It didn’t hurt that we lived in Colorado and in proximity to Utah, but we stopped in many of the parks after we hit the road in our 5th wheel.

Our favorite so far? That’s a difficult choice. I loved Zion and Bryce, and camping on the edge of the Badlands was memorable. Acadia was a bucket list item for me that didn’t disappoint, as was Campobello for Nadyne, along with Rainier and St. Helens. We were both in awe of the sheer size of the giant redwoods, the splendor of the Rockies and, of course, the sights and sounds of the mighty glaciers in Alaska. And I didn’t even mention the Grand Canyon. No, there’s just no way to choose.

Here is the current list (as of this post) of the National Parks we’ve toured, followed by a slideshow of a few of my pics of some of those remarkable places:

  • Acadia (ME)
  • Arches (UT)
  • Badlands (SD)
  • Black Canyon of the Gunnison (CO)
  • Bryce Canyon (UT)
  • Campobello Int’l (ME-NB)
  • Canyonlands (UT)
  • Death Valley (CA-NV)
  • Everglades (FL)
  • Glacier Bay (AK)
  • Grand Canyon (AZ)
  • Grand Teton (WY)
  • Great Sand Dunes (CO)
  • Great Smoky Mountains (TN)
  • Hot Springs (AR)
  • Joshua Tree (CA)
  • Lassen (CA)
  • Mammoth Cave (KY)
  • Mount Rainier (WA)
  • Mount St. Helens (WA)
  • New River Gorge (WV)
  • Petrified Forest (AZ)
  • Pinnacles (CA)
  • Redwood (CA)
  • Rocky Mountain (CO)
  • Saguaro (AZ)
  • Sand Dunes (CO)
  • Wind Cave (SD)
  • Zion (UT)
  • Acadia (ME)
  • Arches (UT)
  • Badlands (SD)
  • Black Canyon of the Gunnison (CO)
  • Bryce Canyon (UT)
  • Campobello International (ME-NB)
  • Canyonlands (UT)
  • Everglades (FL)
  • Glacier Bay (AK)
  • Grand Canyon (AZ)
  • Grand Teton (WY)
  • Great Sand Dunes (CO)
  • Hot Springs (AR)
  • Joshua Tree (CA)
  • Mount Rainier (WA)
  • Mount St. Helens (WA)
  • Pinnacles (CA)
  • Redwood (CA)
  • Rocky Mountain (CO)
  • Saguaro (AZ)
  • Sand Dunes (CO)
  • Wind Cave (SD)
  • Zion (UT)

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Colors From St. Helens Ash
Colors From St. Helens Ash, Washington State

Photo of the Week 006- Originally Selected 6/22/19-
“Colors From St. Helens Ash”

I hadn’t been to the Mount St. Helens National Park in Washington State’s southern Cascade Range in a couple of decades, but drove through it in 2019, and this pic quickly became one of my favorites. The area is almost unrecognizable since my last visit, other than the volcano itself. Nature has a way of reclaiming even the worst of disaster sites. Interestingly, I lived in Eastern Washington in May of 1980 when she blew, and I remember the bizarre ash clouds approaching and reaching us from across the state.

As always, please click on the link to view the clear, full-color image:

https://www.imagekind.com/-colors-from-st-helens-ashdsc_art?IMID=365d26af-97ab-45e6-b76c-5ae816e27928


View photo art created from this photo here:

http://huberjack.imagekind.com/store/imagedetail.aspx/bf66ffbe-40c1-4213-baba-dc8d691bcc0f/Col_Pencil_Colors_From_St_Helens_Ash_DSC05682


View all of my Photos of the Week here on Imagekind:

http://huberjack.imagekind.com/store/Images.aspx/385a532b-9a90-4b4f-8c67-b25c1afa1c07/PhotosoftheWeek

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In applying for a position as a “Color Explorer” I was asked to provide a short essay on what color inspired me and why.  This was my submission:

Many shades of green represent life and prosperity.  In my travels I’ve been fortunate to have encountered and contemplated the flowing green grasses in the Midwest and Southwest, dark pine forests in the Rocky and Cascade Mountains, the thick deciduous woods encompassing the entire east coast, the algae- and lichen-covered rock in Pinnacles National Park, and the greens of desert blooms out west.  Greens are present in the animal kingdom from the shiny emerald feathers of energetic hummingbirds to the leathery skin of lethargic crocodiles, from swift geckos to easy-swimming sea turtles, from vivacious parrots to timid tree frogs.  All of these experiences encourage me to explore nature and its success ever more across North America and beyond.   Even the neon greens of the Aurora Borealis are proof that the planet protects us, despite our attempts to the contrary.

What do you think?

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